True Words

Hi everybody and welcome to a short blog post about how camera gear can influence your success.

When I read my G+ stream this morning I saw a post from Lisa Bettany who wrote something about “not to be limited by the camera gear you own”.
On January the 10th she also wrote something similar linked with a success story of herself. When she started photography with an Canon Rebel DSLR she experimented a lot and shot a backlit cowboy during sunset. She published the image on flickr.com and a year later Lisa got a request by Penguin which wants her image for a book cover.
So, the quintessence is, that she took an experimental photo with entry-level camera gear which got published on a book cover of a Penguin Readers book.
That’s cool, isn’t it?

I can confirm such kind of success with entry-level gear. When I was new to DSLR in 2005, I shot and experimented a lot, too. I started with an entry-class NIKON D70s and cheap but good SIGMA lenses. I went out there in the woods and nature to take great images. While I was walking around and looking for a nice scene, I took notice of a sunlit forest path. The whole scene was backlit and the sun glanced through the branches and flood the path with warm yellow light. I composed a bit then pressed the shutter.
Someday I found a postcard publisher on the net and decided to sent them a few of my images, maybe they would use one for their postcards. A few months later I got a reply from them that they want to use the “sunlit forest path” image for a postcard. Finally, this image got published as a postcard and was distributed in Germany.

As you can see, success doesn’t has to do that much with high-end camera gear. Of course, you cannot cover a fast sports action scene in a dark gym with just a 3 frames per second, noisy ISO 3200 entry-camera and a 18-50mm f3.5-5.6 kit-lens and expect high-class images. Just use your gear in fields that it is suitable for. And use it as effectively as it is possible to cover the best images possible.

And Lisa’s G+ post contains another good tip: If you really need high-end gear for a job, you can always rent it.

Think about it. As a photographer you always have to think of profitability aspects, too.

Have a nice weekend!

Bye!
Chris


Going Commercial

Hi everybody and welcome to this short posting!

I just wanted to give you another tip: If you are interested in commercial photography and you want to go deeper into it maybe Computer Generated Imagery (CGI) is what you have been looking for. Well, today commercial photography becomes more and more post-processing and computer. So, CGI could be the next step to a still more computer based photography.

If you are a student, Autodesk Software offers you a wide product range of their professional software for free! That’s pretty cool. I love these services. Also Microsoft offers this through its Microsoft Developer Network Academic Alliance (MSDN AA).
Just join the Autodesk Education Community. Autodesk will check your data because you need to be a student and enrolled.

For professional CGI use Autodesk 3ds Max.

Bye!
Chris


Portable Solutions

Hi there!

I really like the opportunities of modern photography. There are a lot high-tech and great mounting solutions available for photographers nowadays.

An example:
Today I was looking for a portable flash solution for such as sports coverage. To shoot high-quality sports images in gyms it needs good light. And what provides good light in dark gyms with little available light? You said it! Strobes.  These strobes have to be mounted up high under the ceiling to create a good illumination. Here one needs a small portable solution because there’s often not that much time (especially here in Germany) and opportunities to make an extensive installation with wires all over the place. So I assembled a flash thing which can be mounted easily and nearly everywhere. The mounting basis is a SuperClamp. I equipped it with two Spigots, two Novoflex P19, two SB-800s, a Black-Box and a RadioPopper receiver. Finally, it needs just a few turns to mount the SuperClamp and a few turns to adjust the SB-800s in the right angle. Really easy to use and effective for sports coverage in small halls.

It’s just an application example. There are tons of other possible applications – I’d say it’s like Fisher Price. Built this or that with one and the same parts.
I love it!

Bye!
Chris